Category: Uncategorized

  • Another Respected ANR Veteran Challenges the ANR Wake Boat Draft Rule 

    Angela Shambaugh is a long-time aquatic biologist who until October 2020 worked for Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) within the Agency of Natural Resources (ANR). After reading Bob Popp’s recent comments to the ANR recommending a total wake boat ban on Vermont’s inland lakes and ponds, Angela was inspired to write her own piece. In it she expresses her opinion as a professional, concluding…

  • We Ignore the Warnings of Other States at Our Peril

    Vermont continues to learn about wake boats from the experience around the country. We need to listen. The stories are chilling. In Vermont, wake sports are just beginning to take hold. But we ignore them at our peril. They are coming. They are gaining in popularity. The boats are getting bigger and heavier and more…

  • A Thousand Words … 

    According to Wikipedia, Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen “is widely regarded as the foremost playwright of the nineteenth century.” He also coined the adage “a picture is worth a thousand words.” So, you may ask, why is RWVL talking about Ibsen in this newsletter? Well, we aren’t, at least not directly. But we are talking about…

  • Weighing Whims of the Few Against Rights of the Many 

    Time goes by and the public is still waiting for the Agency of Natural Resources (ANR) to publish its final rule. While acknowledging that everyone feels frustrated by the delay, perhaps we can breathe hope into the fact that this process is taking so long. After all, there were so many public comments made in…

  • Agency Veteran Challenges ANR Wake Boat Proposal 

    Bob Popp, a 30-year veteran botanist of Vermont’s Department of Fish and Wildlife, weighs in on the need to manage wake boats — he recommends a ban on Vermont’s lakes and ponds. Read Bob’s comments to the Lakes and Ponds Division of the Agency of Natural Resources (ANR) and send us back your comments.  Bob Popp eating…

  • Loon Biologist Supports a Strong Wake Boat Rule

    The common loon is a favorite species of many Vermonters. It is also “… a species of greatest conservation need in Vermont …”, according to the Vermont Center for Ecostudies (VCE) and Audubon Vermont. This is in part because loons typically nest only two to eight inches above the water level and within two feet…

  • The Paddlers Speak Out

    Last May, paddler Chip Stone spoke out loud and strong in his compelling VT Digger piece, Wake Boats Are a Genuine Threat to Paddlers. In addition to his love of paddling, Chip is a former state legislator, former commissioner of economic development, and a retired banker. Chip knows his stuff. In his VT Digger piece, he noted that, “Vermont…

  • Is No News from the ANR Good News?

    This is a question we’ve been asking ourselves for the last several weeks as we await the ANR’s final decision on changes to the Use of Public Water Rules regarding wake boats. This is also a question many of you — our supporters — have been asking us for nearly a month. We don’t have insight into where ANR is…

  • Wakesports don’t belong on…

    The weak regulation of wakesports proposed by the Agency of Natural Resources — 500-feet from shore instead of RWVL’s 1,000-feet from shore — would allow wakesports on some of Vermont’s small, crowded, and vulnerable lakes. Lakes where wakesports do not belong. We describe in this newsletter some of the 16 lakes that would suffer under…

  • What is a Safe Wake Height?

    How far does it take for a wake surfer’s wake to dissipate to a safe height? This is a question we should have been asking all along. An interesting source of information that may help us answer this important question comes from the industry-sponsored experimental study conducted by Clifford Goudey and his associates on a…